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21
Aug

Korean War Wall of Remembrance

The Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA) and the Korean War Memorial Foundation (KWMFB) have been trying for some time to get Congress to enact legislation that would allow The Wall of Remembrance (WOR) to be constructed at the site of the Korean War Memorial in Washington, D. C. The Wall of Remembrance (WOR) would have the names of the 37,000 plus Korean War KIA’s/MIA’s engraved in it, much like the Viet Nam Wall

The enacted legislation states that “no federal funds can be used in the construction of The Wall of Remembrance. The Foothills Chapter #301 of The Korean War Veterans Association located in Greenville, SC passed a resolution and named a “Fund-Raising” committee to raise the money for the 547 plus South Carolinians who paid the ultimate price to stop the spread of communism in Asia and to keep South Korea a free nation. South Korea, in a relatively short time, became one of the largest economies in the world, and instead of being a receiver of foreign aid became a provider of foreign aid.

The Korean War was first dubbed a “Police Action.” It was not covered very much by the news media and became known as “The Forgotten War.” But since the founding of the Korean War Veterans Association in the mid-1980’s, it has been working hard to make America knowledgeable of the Korean War, and they are having much success.

Instead of being thought of as “The Forgotten War,” it is now being billed as “The Forgotten Victory.” Just contrast North Korea to South Korea today and it’s easy to understand why it should be billed as “The Forgotten Victory.” While South Korea is wildly successful, North Korea can’t feed their own people or even keep their lights on.

For that, and many other reasons, we not only need to but we “MUST” build this wall to honor America’s the 37,000 plus heroes who sacrificed their lives in this now “The Forgotten Victory.” And we MUST do it now if we want any Korean War Veterans to be around to attend the dedication of the Wall.

The average age of Korean War Veterans today is eighty- five years. The average of men (a few women) fighting in the “Korean War” was nineteen (19) years. If the average age was nineteen (19), there must have been many sixteen (16), seventeen (17), and eighteen (18) year olds on the frontline. The draft had ended after WW II so all of the military in the first few months of the hostilities were volunteers. And yes, they were heroes, every single one of them. All who served in Korea, in my view, were heroes.

As I said, we are raising money for the South Carolina KIA’s/POW’s. But let me hasten to say, every name will be on the Wall, no matter where the money comes from. We are requesting that contributors from South Carolina make checks payable to: KWVA Foothills Chapter #301. In the “FOR” area write “Wall of Remembrance.”

Mail them to: Lewis Vaughn, 623 Ashley Commons Ct., Greer, SC 29651.

If the contributor is not from South Carolina, go to the KWVMF website to make a contribution. Of course, we in South Carolina will accept and appreciate contributions originating anywhere in or outside the U.S.

Thank you!

18
Aug

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member: 1st Sgt Leonidas Crooks, Jr, U.S. Army, 1942-1945

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member:
1st Sgt Leonidas Crooks, Jr, U.S. Army, 1942-1945.
If you wish to create a Remembrance Page for a Veteran, please go to https://TogetherWeServed.net

16
Aug

Actor, PVT Burt Lancaster US Army (Served 1942-1945)

View the service history of actor,

burt-lancaster-01PVT Burt Lancaster 

US Army

(Served 1942-1945)

View his service profile on TogetherWeServed.com

http://army.togetherweserved.com/profile/338168

Short Bio: Burton Lancaster was born the youngest of four children into a happy, but poor family. As a child, he worked shining shoes, selling newspapers, and shovelling snow to help out with domestic finances. The young Burt had hopes of singing opera, but these were dashed when his voice broke.

Lancaster enrolled at New York University in the hope of becoming a gym teacher, but soon got bored and ran away to join the circus, where he became an acrobat.

Burt joined the army in early 1942, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

14
Aug

Medal of Honor recipient and TogetherWeServed.com member Doc Ballard Victim of a Burglary

Colonel Don “Doc” Ballard, Medal of Honor recipient and his wife Virginia suffered a great loss in March while they were visiting the President with other Medal of Honor Recipients. Many items of value were taken plus cash raised by selling MOH books that belonged to Doc’s charitable Forgotten Veterans Program which pays funeral expenses for veterans who don’t qualify for benefits.

I have asked Doc what we can do to help. His answer was Virginia and he would be fine, many items cannot be replaced, but no one was hurt. Doc did say we could help by helping him build up the Forgotten Veterans Program coffers though. To that end, here is the address to send donations for the Forgotten Veterans Program.

Doc also raises funds by selling autographed copies of several Medal of Honor related books. If you would like to order a book, email us at admin@togetherweserved.com and we will be happy to email the form to you.

Send Donations and Book Orders to:
Swan Lake
Attention: The Forgotten Veterans Program
30000 Valor Drive
Grain Valley, MO 64029

11
Aug

About Together We Served

 

ABOUT TOGETHER WE SERVED

If you or a loved one has served our country as a member of the United States Armed Forces, then you’ve come to the right place.

Together We Served (TWS) is the online community connecting and honoring every American who has worn the uniform of the United States military. This is where you reconnect with old friends and share your service story as a lasting legacy for generations to come.

More Than A Decade & Growing

TWS launched in 2003 with a website specifically for Marine Corps veterans. Since then, we’ve expanded to five websites, welcoming members from the U.S. Navy, Air Force, Army and Coastguard. Our vision: to create a unique place for all service members, run by service members, sharing real-life history IN THEIR OWN WORDS. TWS is detailed, honest, and real: an authentic recounting of history as-it-happens.

Today, TWS has more than 1.4 million members and has reconnected more service men and women than any other website or organization. Reunions happen every day. Some veterans haven’t seen each other in 40 years. Some are healed through the reconnections made here. Still others find old friends they thought lost forever. These miraculous stories are inspirational.

A Larger Purpose

On the surface, TWS is a social networking site. However, there is a much larger purpose, one we hope you’ll participate in. TWS is a living, breathing national archive of the most important events in our nations’ history.

Each story and profile here takes its rightful, permanent place in our collective consciousness. In this new, virtual world, every time you log on, share a photograph, recall an experience, or find a comrade, you are contributing to what will be the most intriguing, comprehensive and expandable military archive available.

Our Roll of Honor is a gift to every family who has lost a loved one in service – a personalized online memorial they can contribute to, preserve, and share for posterity. More than 100,000 profiles of Soldiers, Marines, Sailors, Airmen and Coastguardsmen who died while serving in all major U.S. conflicts since WWII already exist here.

Our work is hardly complete. There are currently just over 21 million veterans; nearly 60% are from the Vietnam, Korean and WWII era. We are in a race against time to capture their stories now, while we still can.

What Is Your Story

If you have served this country, you are already a part of this community. And your friends are waiting for you. Welcome to the most important online presentation of our nations’ military history available.
Welcome to Together We Served.

 

Very Respectfully

Brian A. Foster
President and Founder
Together We Served

11
Aug

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member: 1st Sgt Frederick Waggett, Sr, U.S. Army, 1943-1946

 

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member:
1st Sgt Frederick Waggett, Sr, U.S. Army, 1943-1946.
If you served, reconnect with old Service Friends at https://Togetherweserved.com/landing

9
Aug

Join Together We Served as a Family Member

START NOW TO REGISTER YOUR VETERAN AND RECEIVE YOUR FREE FULLY ILLUSTRATED HELP GUIDE

DON’T LET THEIR MILITARY MEMORIES FADE AWAY!

Too often, the stories of service and sacrifice of our Veterans are never told and when they finally leave us, some faded photos, a few medals, and perhaps an old uniform are all that are left to remember what they did serving our country.

Together We Served’s mission is to provide the opportunity for every family member to sit down with their Veteran and record their military service and memories, in their own words and photographs, so that their story may live on for their children, grandchildren, and future generations.

Start Now

9
Aug

Author, Sgt William Manchester  US Marine Corps (Served 1942-1945)

View the service history of author:

william_manchesterSgt William Manchester 

US Marine Corps

(Served 1942-1945)

View his service page on TogetherWeServed.com

http://marines.togetherweserved.com/profile/58017

Short Bio: Author of historical biographies “Death of a President”, “American Caesar” and “The Last Lion”, Manchester served in the Marine Corps, attaining the rank of Sergeant. He was shot in the kneecap on Okinawa’s Sugar Loaf Hill but left the military hospital when he heard his regiment was moving on to Oruku peninsula. Wounded by mortar fire, he also was shot by a Japanese soldier near his heart. He was a recipient of the Purple Heart.

7
Aug

Korean War Wall of Remembrance

The Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA) and the Korean War Memorial Foundation (KWMFB) have been trying for some time to get Congress to enact legislation that would allow The Wall of Remembrance (WOR) to be constructed at the site of the Korean War Memorial in Washington, D. C. The Wall of Remembrance (WOR) would have the names of the 37,000 plus Korean War KIA’s/MIA’s engraved in it, much like the Viet Nam Wall

The enacted legislation states that “no federal funds can be used in the construction of The Wall of Remembrance. The Foothills Chapter #301 of The Korean War Veterans Association located in Greenville, SC passed a resolution and named a “Fund-Raising” committee to raise the money for the 547 plus South Carolinians who paid the ultimate price to stop the spread of communism in Asia and to keep South Korea a free nation. South Korea, in a relatively short time, became one of the largest economies in the world, and instead of being a receiver of foreign aid became a provider of foreign aid.

The Korean War was first dubbed a “Police Action.” It was not covered very much by the news media and became known as “The Forgotten War.” But since the founding of the Korean War Veterans Association in the mid-1980’s, it has been working hard to make America knowledgeable of the Korean War, and they are having much success.

Instead of being thought of as “The Forgotten War,” it is now being billed as “The Forgotten Victory.” Just contrast North Korea to South Korea today and it’s easy to understand why it should be billed as “The Forgotten Victory.” While South Korea is wildly successful, North Korea can’t feed their own people or even keep their lights on.

For that, and many other reasons, we not only need to but we “MUST” build this wall to honor America’s the 37,000 plus heroes who sacrificed their lives in this now “The Forgotten Victory.” And we MUST do it now if we want any Korean War Veterans to be around to attend the dedication of the Wall.

The average age of Korean War Veterans today is eighty- five years. The average of men (a few women) fighting in the “Korean War” was nineteen (19) years. If the average age was nineteen (19), there must have been many sixteen (16), seventeen (17), and eighteen (18) year olds on the frontline. The draft had ended after WW II so all of the military in the first few months of the hostilities were volunteers. And yes, they were heroes, every single one of them. All who served in Korea, in my view, were heroes.

As I said, we are raising money for the South Carolina KIA’s/POW’s. But let me hasten to say, every name will be on the Wall, no matter where the money comes from. We are requesting that contributors from South Carolina make checks payable to: KWVA Foothills Chapter #301. In the “FOR” area write “Wall of Remembrance.”

Mail them to: Lewis Vaughn, 623 Ashley Commons Ct., Greer, SC 29651.

If the contributor is not from South Carolina, go to the KWVMF website to make a contribution. Of course, we in South Carolina will accept and appreciate contributions originating anywhere in or outside the U.S.

Thank you!

4
Aug

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member: Sgt Richard King, U.S. Army Air Corps, 1943-1946

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member:
Sgt Richard King, U.S. Army Air Corps, 1943-1946
If you served, reconnect with old Service Friends at https://Togetherweserved.com/landing

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