Civil War

The Day the South Nearly Won the Civil War (1862)

The Day the South Nearly Won the Civil War (1862)

It has become an accepted historical fact that the South could not have won the American Civil War. The North's advantages in finance, population, railroads, manufacturing, technology, and naval assets, among others, are often cited as prohibitively decisive. Yes, the South had the advantage of fighting on the defensive, this with interior lines, but those two meager pluses appear dwarfed by the North's overwhelming strategic advantages, hence defeat virtually a foregone conclusion. But if...

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MajGen Joshua Chamberlain’s Lost Medal of Honor

MajGen Joshua Chamberlain’s Lost Medal of Honor

By Richard Sisk The long-lost Medal of Honor belonging to the "Lion of Little Round Top" has been found. The Medal awarded to then-Colonel (and later Maj. Gen.) Joshua L. Chamberlain, for his "distinguished gallantry" in leading the 20th Maine volunteers on the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, came by mail to the Pejepscot Historical Society in Maine in July from a donor who wished to remain anonymous. Historians from the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, and the U.S....

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The Civil War Within the Confederacy

The Civil War Within the Confederacy

CIVIL WAR WITHIN THE CONFEDERACY The civil war within the Confederacy is often overshadowed by the actual Civil War. The American Civil War was a titanic struggle between the overwhelming numeric and material advantages of the Union, and the tactical and leadership advantages of the states that would form the  Confederate States of America. In such a large conflict many stories, unfortunately, go untold and it becomes easy to oversimplify each side. The war did not become inevitable...

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