The Christy Collection

Military Stories and Articles

Service Reflections of YN2 George Glover, U.S. Coast Guard (1974-1979)

Service Reflections of YN2 George Glover, U.S. Coast Guard (1974-1979)

I was 19 years old, and it was the Vietnam Era. I had registered for the draft the previous year while in High School in San Diego, CA. I graduated HS and tried going to college, but it just wasn’t for me. So, after a semester, I left college. Now, what am I going to do? I really had no idea. I was thinking of the Navy because my father had served in the Navy during WWII. He had a career of over 22 years and was a BMC. I was going to join the Navy when a friend of mine mentioned the Coast Guard. That had never occurred to me. I was familiar with the USCG Air Station in San Diego and the cutters at Point Loma, and I liked what the Coast Guard did. Not only did they train for war, but they trained for SAR, law enforcement, pollution control, marine safety, etc. I knew that my father would be spinning in his grave as he had passed away, but I went down to the Coast Guard recruiter in San Diego, talked to them, and signed up. After the physical and paperwork was done, I was offered a guaranteed “A” school, YN. I took it and was off to boot camp in Alameda.

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ET2 Alvaro Urioste, U.S. Navy (1996-2004)

ET2 Alvaro Urioste, U.S. Navy (1996-2004)

Has Together We Served helped you find and reconnect with someone you served with? If so, please describe how this happened and what this meant to you. Please add any specific memories of this person and a photo if available.:

My buddy Louie and I served together from 2000-2002 aboard the USS Supply (AOE 6). After I got out in 2004, he lost my number, and we didn’t speak for a couple of years. In 2006, I created my profile on TogetherWeServed.com, hoping to reconnect with some old friends, but I didn’t find anyone I knew. One day, Louie found my profile and, through my bio, discovered that I had moved back home to New Jersey. He couldn’t find my number, so he started looking for people in New Jersey with the same last name as me. After some online searching, he came across the contact number for someone named Claudia. He cold-called this person and asked for me. “Al who?” the woman answered.

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Service Reflections of SSGT Robert Floyd Jones, U.S. Air Force (1966-1976)

Service Reflections of SSGT Robert Floyd Jones, U.S. Air Force (1966-1976)

After one semester in our local “community college” (Edison Junior College), my grades were below the minimum to avoid the draft. Shortly after that, I received a draft notice. Having had relatives in the military, I was resigned to the fact I would have to serve, and I wanted to select a “specialty” that would help me after I had served my country. There was nothing in the Army I wanted to pursue, and I visited my Air Force Recruiter for his input.

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Famous Navy Unit: USS Parche (SS-384)

Famous Navy Unit: USS Parche (SS-384)

The first USS Parche (SS-384) was a United States Navy submarine. She bore the name of a butterfly fish, one of at least 114 species. Butterfly fish have a large spot that looks like an eye on the tail end of their body. Their natural eye is often much smaller or camouflaged within other body markings. This is to trick a predator into thinking the fish will move in the direction of the false eye, thereby giving the small fish a chance to escape capture. USS Parche: World War II Exploits and...

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AME2 Nevin Cumpston, U.S. Navy (1983-1991)

AME2 Nevin Cumpston, U.S. Navy (1983-1991)

What was your favorite piece of military equipment – firearm, apparel, vehicle, aircraft, boat, etc. – and why? What was your least favorite?:

My favorite piece of military equipment is the F-14 fighter aircraft. Having had the privilege of working on them in VF-41 onboard the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) in the mid 1980s as an AME (Aviation Maintenance Equipment) is among the best honors and memories I have of my US Naval service. Working a 12-hour shift, day in and day out, while at sea was my favorite part. Knowing that I had performed maintenance on an aircraft, and watching it be shot off the deck to go perform a mission, was a moment of pride for all of us to see. Becoming turned qualified and being a CDI inspector made it all the better, being able to start the aircraft and help other shops perform their maintenance tasks was the thrill of a lifetime.

Watching the F-14 take off at night in full afterburner while you are standing (kneeling) right next to it was so exhilarating an experience. Feeling the vibrations of the aircraft as the power radiated through the deck to your body, the heat, the sounds, the smell of burning JP5 in the air. Seeing the Jet blast deflectors come up, you knew things were about to become exciting. Feeling the tiny specks of the deck flying through the air and hitting you in the face as the aircraft powers its way down the catapult. Seeing how dirty we were after a day of being on the deck as a final checker or mechanic was also, in a way very cool, it made us feel like we accomplished something.
Having a flight schedule so busy that we only got time to eat box lunches, the bologna sandwiches, chips, and a piece of fruit were certainly welcome during the brutal schedule of flight ops.

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Service Reflections of MMC Kenneth Parment, U.S. Navy (1981-2004)

Service Reflections of MMC Kenneth Parment, U.S. Navy (1981-2004)

PRESERVING A MILITARY LEGACY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS The following Reflections represents MMC Kenneth Parment's legacy of his military service from 1981 to 2004. If you are a Veteran, consider preserving a record of your own military service, including your memories and photographs, on Togetherweserved.com (TWS), the leading archive of living military history. The following Service Reflections is an easy-to-complete self-interview, located on your TWS Military Service Page, which enables you to...

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Service Reflections of AOM2C Barnett Solomon, U.S. Navy (1944-1946)

Service Reflections of AOM2C Barnett Solomon, U.S. Navy (1944-1946)

PRESERVING A MILITARY LEGACY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS The following Reflections represents AOM2C Barnett Solomon's legacy of his military service from 1944 to 1946. If you are a Veteran, consider preserving a record of your own military service, including your memories and photographs, on Togetherweserved.com (TWS), the leading archive of living military history. The following Service Reflections is an easy-to-complete self-interview, located on your TWS Military Service Page, which enables you...

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Service Reflections of CS2 Ronald Berg, U.S. Navy (1963-1974)

Service Reflections of CS2 Ronald Berg, U.S. Navy (1963-1974)

PRESERVING A MILITARY LEGACY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS The following Reflections represents CS2 Ronald Berg's legacy of his military service from 1963 to 1974. If you are a Veteran, consider preserving a record of your own military service, including your memories and photographs, on Togetherweserved.com (TWS), the leading archive of living military history. The following Service Reflections is an easy-to-complete self-interview, located on your TWS Military Service Page, which enables you to...

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CDR Denise McCallaCreary, U.S. Navy (1973-2000)

CDR Denise McCallaCreary, U.S. Navy (1973-2000)

What personal and professional achievements from your Military service are you most proud of and why?:

I retired with the rank of Commander, United States Navy. During my career, I garnered medals, friendships beyond my wildest dream, and a master’s degree from the Naval Postgraduate School and Navy War College. While these achievements are extremely meaningful to me, what I am most proud of was being elected in 2019 by my peers to the position of National President — making me the first female National President of the National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) in 50 years. As a 15-year-old teenager arriving from Kingston, Jamaica, landing in the cold, freezing city of Chicago, Illinois, my dreams were small. After being taken out of my high school in Jamaica, when I was set to graduate, I knew I would need my diploma to succeed in a new country. Failure was not an option. I would have to graduate and go to college. As for what college or vocation I should have strived for, I had no clue.

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Does the U.S. Military Really Use Saltpeter to Calm the Urges of Basic Trainees?

Does the U.S. Military Really Use Saltpeter to Calm the Urges of Basic Trainees?

This old legend might be the first military myth new recruits come across, and it might have been around for as long as saltpeter itself. Despite the combined efforts of science, health education, and common sense, somehow, the myth of the military adding saltpeter to the food or beverages in basic training still persists.  History with Using Nitrated Sodium Salts Why would the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, or Marine Corps do such a thing? The legend says they would add saltpeter to...

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USS Midway Historic Aircraft Carrier & Naval Museum

USS Midway Historic Aircraft Carrier & Naval Museum

The USS Midway aircraft carrier is America’s most popular naval warship museum. Located in downtown San Diego, the museum is open 10am to 5pm 7 days a week, closing only for Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. The museum holds over 700 events a year, from Navy retirements and re-enlistments to changes of command. What is the USS Midway Known For? Commissioned after the culmination of World War II, the USS Midway was one of the longest-serving aircraft carriers of the 20th century. The United...

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