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23
Jun

Cpl Philip Carey US Marine Corps (Served 1943-1952 )

View the service history of actor

16684067_1400457936663193_3209264228734534037_nCpl Philip Carey

US Marine Corps

(Served 1943-1952)

View his service story on TogetherWeServed.com http://marines.togetherweserved.com/profile/362953

Short Bio: Tall, blond and of rugged proportions, handsome actor Philip Carey started out as a standard 1950s film actor in westerns, war stories and crime yarns but didn’t achieve full-fledged stardom until well past age 50 when he joined the daytime line-up as ornery Texas tycoon Asa Buchanan on the popular soap “One Life to Live” (1968) in 1979. Carey served with the Marine Corps during World War II and the Korean War.

21
Jun

FC1c Daniel Galvin, U.S. Navy, 1940 – 1951

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member: FC1c Daniel Galvin, U.S. Navy, 1940 – 1951
If you wish to create a Remembrance Page for a Veteran, please go to https://TogetherWeServed.net

19
Jun

Preserve Your Old Photos: Let Us Help for Free!

Do you have old photos from your service days stashed away in a drawer or in a shoebox in your attic? Old photos fade with time and if they are not scanned and preserved digitally, they risk eventually being lost forever. This is where TWS can help.

We have just invested in a high quality Fujitsu book and photo scanner that can scan any size of photo or yearbook. As a service to our members, we would like to offer you a free photo scanning service for your most significant photos from your service which we will then return to you, in original condition, along with a CD containing your photo files.

In addition, we can upload your photos for you to your Photo Album on your TWS Service Profile which will also appear in your Shadow box and available to you to access or download at any time.

This service is available only to members of Together We Served. If you are not currently a member, join us today at https://togetherweserved.com/landing
Please contact us at Admin@togetherweserved.com for full details on this Free Service or call us on (888) 490-6790.

16
Jun

Sgt Martin Balsam US Army Air Force (Served 1941-1945)

View the service history of actor

17553915_1464918110217175_6042881000981541897_nSgt Martin Balsam

US Army Air Force

(Served 1941-1945)

View his Service Profile on TogetherWeServed.comat
http://airforce.togetherweserved.com/profile/122672

Short Bio: During World War II, the character actor served with the United States Army as a combat engineer and later with the Army Air Force. Upon his return home, he enrolled at the Dramatic Workshop of the New School for Social Research, where he was tutored by the acclaimed German theater director Erwin Piscator. He furthered his skills at the Actors Studio in New York.

14
Jun

SSgt Dale VanBlair, U.S. Army Air Corps, 1942-1945

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member: SSgt Dale VanBlair, U.S. Army Air Corps, 1942-1945.
If you served, reconnect with old Service Friends at https://Togetherweserved.com/landing

12
Jun

Band of Brothers

By LtCol Mike Christy-TogetherWeServed Dispatches

Once the long line of passengers ahead of me finished fumbling with stowing their carry-on luggage in the overhead bins and taking their seats, I at least reached my aisle seat near the center of the plane. I sat down, buckled in and exchanged “hellos” with the young man sitting in the center seat next to me. I then closed my eyes in preparation for my normal routine of falling asleep even before the plane leaves the ground. This day was different, however. I was too excited to sleep.

Forty-two years ago, I had met some exceptional young men. We were all part of a rifle company humping the jungles of Vietnam, including two months during the Cambodia incursion in 1970. Now, in a matter of hours, I would be seeing 18 of them at a reunion in Myrtle Beach, S.C. I knew they would have aged, but in my mind’s eye, they are still the brave young warriors who did their duty in a nasty war they didn’t totally understand. And through it all, bonded together as brothers, placing their lives in each other’s hands. I was proud to be one of them.

When the plane reached cruising altitude and the pilot finished welcoming us aboard, I began a conversation with the young man. His name was Jason, an engineer from Atlanta, who was heading home following a business trip to Los Angeles. When he asked me where I was going, I told him about meeting up with some men I served with in Vietnam. “We read about Vietnam in high school,” he said, “but I didn’t learn much. There were only four or five paragraphs about it in our history book.” That amazed me. How could a 10-year war that changed the United States in so many ways rate less than half a dozen paragraphs? I decided to tell Jason as much about the hows and whys of the war as best I understood them and what I observed from my ringside seat.

When I finished, Jason wanted to know how the men felt about the war. “They didn’t want to be there,” I answered. “They were a long way from home in a hot, dangerous place full of bad smells, bugs, and snakes. Every step they took, they didn’t know if it would be their last. Yet in spite of all the uncertainty, the camaraderie we built among each other is what kept most of us going. We had each other’s back.”

Our conversation was interrupted by a pretty flight attendant asking us what we’d like to drink. I got some water and Jason got a coke. Sipping our drinks, we both fell into silence. Soon Jason closed his eye, perhaps contemplating what he had just learned about the Vietnam War from an eyewitness. I stared ahead, lost in thought about the reunion and how it would not have happened without a website exclusively for veterans.

TogetherWeServed.com is an exclusive website where former, retired and active duty men and women reconnect and bond. It’s also a place where I met some really great people.

The first time I signed on, I was surprised how easy it was to navigate and within a couple of hours, I found six old army buddies. When someone becomes a member there are encouraged to fill out their profile page with as much personal information about their military and personal history. There are places for unit assignments, awards, schools attended and military and personal photos. To capitalize on this powerful search capacity, I filled out my profile on both the Marine Corps and Army site as completely as possible.

I had joined the U.S. Marine Corps after graduating from high school in 1956, then joined the Army as an infantry second lieutenant in 1966 during the height of Vietnam War. Following a year of selected training, I was assigned to the 5th Special Forces Group in 1967. My first four-month was on A-Team 102 Tien Phouc along the Song Tran River southwest of Na Trang for four months. The remainder of my tour was with Project Delta, a special operations units running small reconnaissance teams deep in enemy-held territory. Today the unit is known as Delta Force.

My second tour began in 1969 when I was a rifle company commander of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). In May 1970, we operated for two months in Cambodia. I retired a Lieutenant Colonel in 1984 and jumped into a career as a writer and documentary filmmaker.

With my entire military career uploaded on both my Marine Corps and Army profiles, it wasn’t long before I begin getting messages from old Army buddies, most of whom I served with in Vietnam.

After months of exchanging emails and messages over the TWS message center with Vietnam comrades, the idea of holding a reunion began to take shape. There was a lot of enthusiasm and the beginning of some planning. The final shove, however, came from somewhere else.

One day, I got a TWS message from an unknown veteran. He wrote he had been a member of our company when it arrived in Vietnam in 1965 and for the past eight years, the original members had been meeting for reunions every two years. He wanted to open up the next reunion to be held in Myrtle Beach to all veterans from all years who served in the company. I wrote back we would be there and got busy getting the word out.

Reflecting on how it all came about, I was struck by the versatility of TWS. It not only brings together long-lost friends, it’s a national archive where millions of stories and photos are posted, and with each, a lasting legacy of America’s military heritage.

Whenever I get the chance, I like to search for photos and stories posted by vets who served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. It never fails to amaze me the detail some of the veterans have posted. It is better than a history book because it’s personal and because of these living, breathing “scrapbooks” come straight from the gut and the heart. The postings by friends and relatives honoring the men and women who paid the supreme sacrifice are the ones that get me the most.

Somewhere in my mental praising of why I love Together We Served, I’d fallen asleep. The next thing I felt was the plane leveling off and the pilot telling us we would be landing in 15 minutes. The head flight attendant got on the horn with some gate numbers for some connecting flights and thanked us for flying their airline.

The plane landed at the Atlanta and parked at a gate. Walking off the plane I said goodbye to Jason and headed for the gate my flight to Myrtle Beach would depart. Two hours later the commuter plane landed. I called the hotel where I would be staying and where the reunion was being held. In a matter of minutes, a van picked me up.

The excitement and anticipation was growing inside as I realized that within minutes, I would be coming face-to-face with some of my combat buddies after more than four decades. They understood better than anyone else about what Vietnam meant because they were there, they shared in the experience too. No doubt Shakespeare had us in mind when he wrote in Henry V, “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers”.

This article appeared in the April 2013 Vietnam magazine

9
Jun

LtJg Dennis Day US Navy (Served 1944-1946)

View the service history of singer

11145142_935578126484512_1442947183559891678_nLtJg Dennis Day

US Navy

(Served 1944-1946)
Shadow box: http://navy.togetherweserved.com/profile/523814

Short Bio: Always bright and beaming from ear to ear, Irish singer Dennis Day’s name and career remains synonymous with that of Jack Benny’s, working with the star comedian on radio and TV for the entire duration. It was Jack who gave him his break in 1939 and Jack who kept him employed as a singer and naive comic sidekick (his “Gee, Mr. Benny!” became a well-known catchphrase on the show).

7
Jun

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member: AD3 Benjamin Couillard

Tribute to a Veteran – Together We Served Member: AD3 Benjamin Couillard, U.S. Navy, 1943 – 1946
If you wish to create a Remembrance Page for a Veteran, please go to https://TogetherWeServed.net

5
Jun

View Your Entry in Our Roll of Honor!

As a fitting tribute to our Members of Together We Served, your service to our country is now honored in our Roll of Honor, the most powerful online display of Living, Fallen and Deceased Veterans existing today. Our 1.67 million Veteran Members, who served from WWII to present day, now have a dedicated entry displaying a brief service summary of their service and their photo in uniform if posted.

You can find your Roll of Honor entry easily – click on the graphic below and select your service branch. Then enter your name in the Quicksearch window. Alternatively, you can select your service separation year and scroll down. Please check your entry for accuracy and update any information, such as your Last Unit, plus add your service photo for completeness. You can do this by logging into TWS and clicking on the “My Profile” tab.

If you have any questions regarding your entry in our Roll of Honor, please don’t hesitate to contact us at Admin@togetherweserved.com or contact our Live Help Desk at the bottom left of your TWS website.

 

2
Jun

Pvt Red Skelton US Army (Served 1944-1945)

View the service history of comedian:

skeltonPvt Red Skelton

US Army

(Served 1944-1945)

View his Service Profile on TogetherWeServed.com

http://army.togetherweserved.com/profile/303437

Short Bio: Red Skelton was already a popular comedian with his own show called The Raleigh Cigarette Program when he was drafted in March 1944, and the popular series was discontinued. Shipped overseas to serve with an Army entertainment unit as a private, Red Skelton had a nervous breakdown in Italy, spent three months in a hospital and was discharged in September, 1945. He once joked about his military career, “I was the only celebrity who went in and came out a private.” On December 4, 1945. Raleigh Cigarette Program resumed where it left off with Red Skelton introducing some new characters, including Bolivar Shagnasty and J. Newton Numbskull. Lurene Tuttle and Verna Felton appeared as Junior’s mother and grandmother. David Forrester and David Rose led the orchestra, featuring vocalist Anita Ellis. The announcers were Pat McGeehan and Rod O’Connor. The series ended May 20, 1949 and Red moved to CBS to continue his radio career

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